Buddy Read – The Girls by Emma Cline

March 2017 – Mel’s choice

The Girls

by Emma Cline

Published 2016

Genres: Fiction / Literary

“I didn’t tell him that I wished I’d never met Suzanne. That I wished I’d stayed safely in my bedroom in the dry hills near Petaluma, the bookshelves packed tight with the gold-foil spines of my childhood favourites. And I did wish that. But some nights, unable to sleep, I peeled an apple slowly at the sink, letting the curl lengthen under the glint of the knife. The house dark around me. Sometimes it didn’t feel like regret. It felt like a missing.”

1969. California. Fourteen-year-old Evie Boyd is living a standard suburban teenage life- trying to make sense of her split family situation, learning about herself, noticing boys. And noticing the group of scruffy, devil-may-care girls who keep crossing her path. Something about them is alluring to her. One of them in particular sticks in her mind, and through some coincidental events, Evie manages to weave her way into their group and become entwined in their lives. Living off the grid, she experiences drugs and sex, and very quickly leaves her old life behind. However the influence of the group’s “leader”, Russell, is about to become something more than she could have ever foreseen.

 

Mel says…

I chose this book for our March Buddy Read as I had heard such amazing reviews. Celebrities were posting about it and it made me want to find out what all the fuss was about.

At the start, I enjoyed the writing style of Emma Cline. The back and forth from past to present was intriguing, for about half the book. I found the present day Evie to become irrelevant. There seemed no real logical explanation for bothering with present day Evie. She added zero value to the storyline, in my opinion and I began getting irritated when I would turn the page and there she would be, for the next 10-20 pages.

From start to finish, I was expecting something….more. I felt like I was constantly on the brink of some huge revelation in Evie’s life, that never came. She was the kind of protagonist that you wish would be killed off in the dying pages. She was infuriating and I just couldn’t get on board with her way of thinking, even when I tried stepping back into teenage-Mel’s shoes.

I think the saving grace for me was the plot itself. I have always been intrigued with real life crime stories and this was very closely related to the Charles Manson story. The cult following, the era and the murders. This is what kept me reading and I have to admit, by the end, I was somewhat relieved it was over and was severely disappointed!

It took me weeks to write this review after finishing The Girls. Partly because of my poor time management, but mainly due to the fact that as the days wore on, I forgot what actually occurred. If I could sum this book up in one word it would be; Forgettable!

Rating:

Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

Janelle says…

Well, it started out ok.

It’s no secret that this story is meant to be reminiscent of the evolution of the Manson family. But if you’re going into it expecting a lot of gruesome details and a focus on the murders, you’ll be disappointed. This is a story about puberty, love, friendships, and learning about oneself – your limitations, your image, your self-restraint.

As far as a book that studies the above topics goes, it doesn’t do a bad job. If I was reading this about 15 years ago, I probably would have felt very connected to the internal challenges that the main character Evie faces. I could definitely identify with her at certain times, particularly in her defiant moments.

But…..that’s it. In all honesty I just found this to be, well, boring. I had the scene all figured out within the first 100 pages or so, I didn’t need it to go on with the same stuff for the next 250. It probably didn’t help that I had already read reviews and opinions on this book when it first came out, but still, that didn’t stop me wanting to read it. Now that I have read it though, I found it lacking in substance, and basically just forgettable.

Teens and other people into YA would probably really enjoy this, but personally I think I just can’t be interested in teenage girl problems. I wasn’t interested in them when I was a teenage girl myself. Sorry not sorry.

 

Rating:

Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

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Read together: July 2015 – Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer

July 2015 – Janelle’s choice

Annihilation

by Jeff VanderMeer

annihilation

Published 2014

Genres: Fiction / Sci-Fi

“The air was so clean, so fresh, while the world back beyond the border was what it had always been during the modern era: dirty, tired, imperfect, winding down, at war with itself. Back there, I had always felt as if my work amounted to a futile attempt to save us from who we are.”

The biologist has joined the twelfth expedition to Area X – an area uncharted and lost to the rest of society, affected by an unspecified environmental disaster we know only as The Event. With no clear objective, only vague details of the landscape, and an awareness of the ill-fated eleven expeditions before them, the four expedition members are wary of their surroundings and one another. They soon discover things existing in this desolated place that none of them have ever come across before. What has happened in Area X? What happened to the members of the expeditions before them? And can they trust each other?

 

Janelle says…

I found the writing to be report-like a lot of the time, which made sense as it was written as one of the character’s field journals. But with the language being somewhat clinical at times, this caused me to zone out at times and I had to read some sections over repeatedly before I was clear on what was being said.

“The recurring data points found in the journals that related to repeating cycles and fluctuations of seasons of the strange and ordinary were useful in establishing trends.”

See what I mean?

This meant it wasn’t a fast read, even though the book is under 200 pages! I wasn’t drawn in until about a quarter of the way through the book. Strange things start to happen, but as you’re following the story through the biologist’s eyes, you’re just as clueless as she is.

You don’t find out where Area X is in relation to the “real” world. You don’t find out what happened in Area X to set it apart. You don’t find out why The Southern Reach are sending expeditions in to Area X. You don’t find out any logical explanations for anything that happens or anything that is seen in Area X. You don’t even find out the names of any of the characters mentioned in the whole book.

Sounds like there are a lot of holes? There are, but that’s half the fun of the book – trying to put two and two together, coming up with your own theories….it becomes a puzzle to solve. Although I don’t think I got close to solving it. Maybe it can’t be solved? I’ll just have to read the other two books in the trilogy to find out.

I found underlying themes in this book of overcoming grief and loneliness, how we can be hindered by these states and how we can be helped by them. But mostly, it’s just an interesting piece of sci-fi fun, I don’t think there are aspirations for literary greatness here. I haven’t read The Hunger Games series, but having seen one of the movies, I thought this story was vaguely reminiscent. HG fans might like to give it a try. You’d also like this book if you like stories that have you trying to solve riddles and connect dots.

I did enjoy this book, I thought it was just the right size, and I’ll be continuing on with the next book in the series to learn what happens next in Area X!

Rating:

Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

Mel says…

To be honest until Janelle suggested this book for our second joint review, I had never even heard of the author, Jeff VanderMeer. The initial description of this series sounded intriguing and I was honestly excited about reading this book. Then I started reading…

I found this book so confusing and frustrating. I didn’t understand who was who as the characters don’t go by their actual names, but by their specialised area, for example – The Biologist, The Psychologist, The Surveyor, The Anthropologist and The Linguist. If you are like me and have bare minimum science interest/knowledge, these titles and ways in which the characters were described will go straight over your head.

By page 40 I was struggling to scrape the desire from the bottom of the barrel to pick the book up and continue. Ok, that is a tad harsh, but you get the point.

On a positive note, there were parts of the book that I found interesting, but then it would revert to science-speak and I would be lost all over again. I am not a fan of sci-fi and honestly struggle to understand the lingo, so I struggled to finish this book. Sorry folks, this one was a flop for me!

Rating:

Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

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