Resonating – Leave Me by Gayle Forman

Leave Me

by Gayle Forman


Published 2016

Genres: Fiction


“What is the matter with you?”

“What’s the matter? I’m here alone all day with my mother and the kids and I still feel like shit.” She paused, waiting for Jason to respond but he didn’t say anything. “You’re never here. I can’t tell if you’re trying to avoid home, or if you think that a week in the hospital, a week of recovery, was enough luxury for old Maribeth.”

“What are you talking about?”

“You promised me a bubble,” she said, her voice cracking.

“I’m trying, Maribeth. But keeping you in the bubble and keeping the house running and keeping on top of my job is no easy feat.”

“Welcome to every fucking day of my life.”


Maribeth is like so many other mums – forever chasing a never-ending to-do list, always putting everyone else first, and rarely feeling appreciated. No wonder she didn’t even notice that she was having a heart attack.

At home on leave from work and trying to recover, Maribeth is finding that even now, life must go on and there’s no rest to be found. Why does it seem that only mothers can never catch a break? Even after having a heart attack, her family can’t cut her some slack. What if she had died? How would they ever cope if she wasn’t around?

So, she decides to let them find out…..


Janelle says…

This is one of those books that makes you want to scream “YES! I KNOW!” and then berate your husband for not understanding. Poor Maribeth – I feel you, girl! Not that I’ve ever had a heart attack and had to rely on my family being able to fend for themselves and let me recuperate. BUT I have often wondered just how well, or not, they would do under those circumstances.

The tasty thing about this book is that you get to live out that evil little fantasy vicariously through Maribeth, as she takes the plunge on your behalf. And it is satisfying as all get out. Maribeth actually does just pack up and leave her family to their own devices, heading off to who-the-hell-cares to do god-knows-what, just as long as it doesn’t involve looking after other people for a change. Regardless of whether you’re a parent or not, haven’t we all just wanted to throw our hands up in the air at some point and say “I’M OUT!”

So off she goes, with no real plan and not knowing how long she’ll stay away. She has to find a place to rent, a new grocery store, new friends, a new cardio specialist to keep an eye on her…..and for a while, she doesn’t seem to think about her family all that much, only writing the occasional un-sent letter to her children. But of course, with each passing day Maribeth examines her relationships – past, present and future – her own worth, and her happiness. We see her coming to realise that, even though they can be a pain in the arse and unbelievably inconsiderate at times, her family gives her life meaning and satisfaction that she can’t get otherwise. Having had them, she can’t go back to NOT having them. Being a mother and wife are integral to who she is.

I loved this book, it resonated with me so much and even weeks on from finishing it, I’m still thinking about it and realising new ideas to ponder in it. It’s an easy read, and if you love books that examine families and relationships and identity, then you must put this on your list.



Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

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Peculiarly Perfect – Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children Series by Ransom Riggs

Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children Series

by Ransom Riggs


Published 2011-2015

Genres: Fiction/Fantasy/Young Adult

 A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of curious photographs.

A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.

A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

‘Peculiars – The hidden branch of any species, human or animal, that is blessed – and cursed – with supernatural traits. Respected in ancient times, feared and persecuted more recently, peculiars are outcasts who live in the shadows…’

Mel says…

It has been a long time, well since Harry Potter, that I have found a book series that captured my attention so quickly. Enter ‘Miss Peregrine’s’. I read the first book over 6 months ago, just before the birth of my first baby and I really enjoyed it, rating the first book 4 stars on Goodreads.

It was several months until I was able to get my hands on book two, Hollow City and I must admit, the plot just got better. The characters are so loveable and it is hard not to get attached to each and every one of the Peculiar Children as time goes on. The second book of the series picks up immediately where book one left off and it gets straight down to business. I loved the second book enough to give it a rare Five stars. It built perfectly on book one and just grew from strength to strength, with the introduction of further Peculiar’s and the great land that I now know as ‘Peculiardom’.

Sadly, all good things must come to an end and that is how I felt while reading ‘Library of Souls’. It is hard to complete a series that has such complexities as Miss Peregrine’s, with so many dimensions to characters and landscapes, but Riggs has done a perfect job in tying up loose ends. Although it took me a while to complete the third instalment, this was due to life and not a reflection on the story itself. Trust me, I was not impressed at being stalled from devouring this gem, at all!

Overall, the Miss Peregrine series is a must read for fans of YA and fantasy. I LOVED the concept of storytelling through the use of old photographs, which is not something I have yet come across, but found that as the series went on, fewer photographs were used to depict events and characters, but that isn’t to say that this was a bad thing.

Ransom Riggs has created a world full of peculairities (pun intended) and I for one am a HUGE fan. I look forward to seeing the movies however, I hope that they stay true to the books.

Overall SERIES rating:

Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

Bookfair book haul!


My biggest bookfair haul yet!

Janelle says…

A couple of weeks ago was one of our most anticipated events of the year – the spring Lifeline bookfair (the other annual event we anticipate being the summer bookfair, of course). I took a leave day from work to go to the bookfair….using the excuse that I was taking the day off in lieu of my birthday which was 3 days earlier. But who am I kidding, I would have taken the day off regardless! Despite the fair being held in a smaller venue than usual this time, resulting in quite a squishy and uncomfortable experience, Mel and I (and baby Phoebe!) still had a ball as we always do. We were there for around 4 hours which is a bit of a record for us, and really made a morning of it, stopping for a coffee and a snack and a peruse of our books halfway through.

 In my years of attending the bookfair I have learned some valuable lessons-

  • the best time to go is always 9am on the first day – somehow, this is when the best books are up for grabs;
  • you mustn’t rely on a tote/grocery/shoulder bag to carry your books in, lest you be in pain. Rolling suitcases are the only way to go;
  • always carry water and a snack, just in case;
  • if you see a book that you’re not too sure about, just pick it up anyway. You can review your finds and cull them later if you must, but just go go go!

You see that picture up there? Probably one of my favourite pictures ever. And let’s face it, probably one of my best days ever! Anyway, the excitement still hasn’t worn off for me yet. I still have the massive book pile on the floor next to my bed (because I’ve run out of bookshelf space) which I look at every day, and it both makes me smile and makes me hyperventilate because WHEN AM I GOING TO FIND THE TIME TO READ THEM ALL?!

I went to the bookfair with no specific “list” in mind. I just know in my head what books are on my TBR, and my plan was – if you see them, grab them! So, what did I grab?


Books I don’t really know much about, but bought because I have heard either it or the author mentioned somewhere before, and/or because I liked the cover:

The World Without Us – Mireille Juchau

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes: and other lessons from the crematory – Caitlin Doughty

The Bone Clocks – David Mitchell

After the Crash – Michel Bussi

The Paying Guests – Sarah Waters

Burial Rites – Hannah Kent

Clade – James Bradley

Swamplandia! – Karen Russell

The Hive – Gill Hornby

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August – Claire North


Books I bought by authors I haven’t read before, but because I’m jumping on the bandwagon:

The Passage – Justin Cronin

Eleanor & Park – Rainbow Rowell

Carry On – Rainbow Rowell

Landline – Rainbow Rowell


Books I bought because I have the first books in the series and want to have a full set, even though I haven’t read those first books yet:

Home – Marilynne Robinson

Lila – Marilynne Robinson

A God in Ruins – Kate Atkinson


Books over which I audibly squealed when I found them, such was my delight:

The Natural Way of Things – Charlotte Wood

Girl Waits with Gun – Amy Stewart

Gold Fame Citrus – Claire Vaye Watkins

Oryx & Crake – Margaret Atwood


Books I found which weren’t previously on my TBR, but which spoke to me at the time:

A Journey to Peace through Yoga – Lynette Dickinson

Ice Cream & Sadness – Cyanide & Happiness Vol. 2


So this brought my total of books I own and haven’t read up to 135, noting that I have since read The Natural Way of Things. I don’t want to think about how many years it will take me to read the other 134….


Have you read any of the above books? If so, what did you think? Did you go to the Lifeline bookfair?

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Mini-reviews – what I’ve read in the past three months



Janelle says…

I feel like I have been neglecting LBoB over the past few months. I think it’s been a combination of having had other activities I’ve needed to prioritise in my spare time, and feeling like my recent reads weren’t anything to write home (or to you!) about. I’ve actually been finding it difficult to concentrate in the act of reading, and I feel like I’ve become more impatient too – if not much is happening in a book and there are long stretches of seemingly useless banter, I get very cranky!

But I HAVE been reading, so I thought I would do a round-up of what I’ve read lately, or mini-reviews if you will. Here’s what I’ve read since my last individual book review back in July, and what I thought:


The Girl With All the Gifts – M.R. Carey (Fiction / Thriller)

5 stars

I just loved the premise of this book, and it didn’t disappoint. Something was happening every few pages in this book, all the while teasing you to choose sides and guess where it’s all leading, which inevitably is to a satisfying ending. Recommend.


City of Bones (Mortal Instruments #1) – Cassandra Clare (Fiction/Fantasy/YA)

4 stars

I had a craving for some fantasy YA, and found this on audiobook from my library. Even though it was a bit cliche in parts, I really enjoyed immersing myself in this world of Shadowhunters and Downworlders, enough to dip into the second book in the series a bit later….


The Midnight Zoo – Sonya Hartnett (Fiction/YA)

1 star

Another audiobook, this one was a very quick read and sounded quite sweet – two young brothers, stranded in a place annihilated by war, take refuge in a zoo where they discover a menagerie of talking animals. But no, it was just boring. I only bothered to finish it because I knew it was so short.


Uprooted – Naomi Novik (Fiction/Fantasy)

4 stars

On a fantasy roll! This one was on my wishlist for so long, and it just kept getting thrown in my face, in the end I had to just run to the library to get it. I actually would like to re-read this at some point, because I adored the mystical, slightly dark, super magical world that Novik has created (I believe this story is based on a traditional folk tale), but for some reason I really struggled to focus each time I picked it up. It may have been the weight of it (hardcover) combined with the small font. Would still recommend though.


City of Ashes (Mortal Instruments #2) – Cassandra Clare  (Fiction/Fantasy/YA)

2 stars

Back for more. I didn’t enjoy this one as much as the first in the series, there didn’t seem to be as much happening, and I just couldn’t be sympathetic to some of the teenager-problems going on. I’d still give this series one more crack though by moving on to #3, before I threw in the towel.


Bad Feminist – Roxane Gay (Non-fiction/Essays)


SO DISAPPOINTED. The essays in this book weren’t necessarily bad, in fact a couple of them were really entertaining (particularly the one about the intricacies of the professional poker world). But I went in to this expecting some strong statements about feminism in modern day culture, and most of the time I couldn’t see that represented in what I was reading. It felt more like a memoir to me, which is fine, just not what I signed on for.


Smoke – Dan Vyleta (Fiction/Fantasy)

1 star

All I knew about this one, is that it is set in a world where people’s bodies smoke if they are sinful or evil. That conjures up a lot of questions for me, so I just had to do it. But that general idea was as exciting as this book got. It got real confusing really fast, I had absolutely no idea what was going on or what the characters motives were, and even though I stuck it out to the end I still couldn’t really tell you what happened.


Shiver (Wolves of Mercy Falls #1) – Maggie Stiefvater (Fiction/Fantasy/YA)


I went into this hoping it wouldn’t be too Twilight-esque, and liking the idea of a girl having a human connection with a wild wolf. But about a third of the way through, I’d had enough of “the feelings” and how amazing they were. It was becoming clear that it was running too parallel to Twilight for my liking.


The Natural Way of Things – Charlotte Wood (Fiction/Literary)

2 stars

Oh, that cover. What could possibly go wrong? I nearly shrieked with joy when I saw this amongst the piles at the recent local bookfair. I dived into it straight away….and it was weird….and then it got weirder….and weirder and more confusing….and I was confused and a little disgusted too….and then it ended and I was more confused than ever. I know there are messages and ideas in here, but they were too abstract for my liking. There was no resolution at the end. I have questions. I need closure.


So, that’s what I’ve been up to for the past few months. There were a few good reads in there, but overall, it has been a disappointing reading time. I’m desperately hoping that I’ll pick some reads soon that really blow my mind!

Have you read any of the above books? Do you agree or disagree with my thoughts?

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Flat – A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

A Court of Thorns and Roses

by Sarah J. Maas


Published 2015

Genres: Fiction/Fantasy/Young Adult

When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a beast-like creature arrives to demand retribution. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she knows about only from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not an animal but Tamlin – one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled their world.

As Feyre dwells on his estate, her feelings for Tamlin transform from icy hostility to a fiery passion that burns through every lie and warning she’s been told about the beautiful, dangerous world of the Fae. But an ancient, wicked shadow over the faerie lands is growing, and Feyre must find a way to stop it…or doom Tamlin – and his world – forever.

Mel says…

When I first decided to read this book, I didn’t really know much about it except that images of the cover were all over Instagram and blog posts, so I knew it had a lot of fans. I’m not usually into too much fantasy, but was excited to give this a read nonetheless.

My first impressions were pretty good. I devoured the first quarter of this book fairly quickly, but then I started to get bored of it. Too much of the characteristics of the protagonist, Feyre (pronounced, Fay-ruh) reminded me of The Hunger Games protagonist, Katniss Everdeen. For one, her family was poor and living in starvation – same as Katniss. Two, she had to hunt to feed her family – same as Katniss. Three, she was described as being a tomboy, yet beautiful – same as Katniss. The similarities between ACoTR and The Hunger Games didn’t stop there, but you get the picture.

The main focus of this story centres around Feyre and Tamlin’s relationship. It is described as ‘burning passion’, so you know it is going to be juicy. I found the relationship between them to actually be pretty boring. It seemed like it went from pure hatred on day 1 to passion and sex on day 4. Maybe not in that exact timeline, but it was that quick of a shift, that you get the point. I found it confusing, but I also found that some of the plot and descriptive writing fell flat. I struggled to picture a fair few of the characters as the descriptions weren’t written well.

This is one of those books where I found the main character so irritating, that I struggled to keep reading at times. For whatever reason, Maas kept jamming down our throats that Feyre was a painter. With every description of scenery, Feyre would think ‘if only I could paint this’, or ‘I tried to store every line of his face in my memory, so I could paint him later’. This happened all. the. TIME! We get it, she likes to paint. Moving on…

I know I have slammed this book with my above comments, but in the end, I finished it with the intent of seeking out the second book in the series. I’m in no hurry to read the second book, but I will eventually, when I need a bit of a ‘nothing’ book to fill some time. Seeing as this book took me a month to read, when the text is actually quite large and I didn’t really engage with many of the characters, I can’t give it anymore than 2-stars. Sorry!


Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

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Buddy read – Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty

August 2016 – Janelle’s choice

Truly Madly Guilty

by Liane Moriarty


Published 2016

Genres: Fiction / Suspense

The air rushed from Clementine’s lungs. Afterwards, everyone would say, ‘It happened so fast’, and it did happen fast, but at the same time it slowed down, every second a freeze-frame in unforgettable full colour, lit by golden fairy lights.

Clementine leaped to her feet so fast her chair fell over. What? Where? Who?

This story revolves around three families – Erika and Oliver; Clementine, Sam, Holly and Ruby; and Tiffany, Vid and Dakota. Their insecurities, their worries, their relationships with one another, and the life events that have shaped the people they presently are. But most of all, it revolves around one day in all of their lives when their worlds are irrevocably changed. One incident at a backyard barbeque that changes everything.

Janelle says…

I think it’s safe to say I’m a “Liane Moriarty fan”, now having read two of her books. Big Little Lies blew me away with its suspense and all the connections between characters, I was really looking forward to more of the same with Moriarty’s newest – Truly Madly Guilty.

The narrative jumps back and forth between life prior to the barbeque (which is the defining point in the book), and then replaying the barbeque itself up until the point of the “incident”, and then throwing to life after the barbeque. All the while, hints are dropped along the way about what might have happened at the get-together but never giving enough away that the reader can piece it together. The gap between the two narratives gradually closes until we finally reach the incident itself and all is revealed.

As said about Big Little Lies, I do really enjoy this format of slowly working away at the puzzle, especially when the end result is something completely surprising that I didn’t see coming. All in all I enjoyed this book, the plot kept me hanging on to find out what happens, while also bringing up interesting thoughts around the themes of what is socially acceptable as an adult, as a parent, and just as a person in the world.

I had two reasons for not rating it any higher than 3 out of 5. Firstly, to me it was a dead ringer for another Australian book I read a couple of years ago, which shall remain unnamed so as not to give away the endings of either book, BUT the endings were so eerily similar that I couldn’t get it out of my head and it really bugged me that I felt like I was reading something I’d already read. My other reason is that I didn’t think it needed to go on for as long as it did. This is a pretty hefty book, and there were moments where I was reading and thinking “Yes yes yes, get to the point…how is there still 200 pages to go?!!”

It’s no Big Little Lies, but if you’re a Moriarty fan, it’s definitely worth a read.


Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

Mel says…

This is the third Liane Moriarty book I have read and it followed the same suspenseful format that I have come accustomed to. The day this book launched, I had my hot little hands on my own copy and began devouring it. By page 100, I was hooked and hungry to know what the big “incident” at the barbecue was, that the characters kept eluding to.

The characters were all so personable. Vid was the kind of man I would love to be friends with, his wife Tiffany was the kind of woman I would be intimidated by, Clementine was the kind of person I would warm to and Erica was the kind of woman I would try and avoid. As the story unfolded, these opinions started to shift and not necessarily in the way I thought they would.

It took a fair amount of reading, but once I approached the actual “incident”, it had me gasping in shock and dismay. I couldn’t continue reading until I had given myself time to digest what happened. As the story continued past the barbecue, I started to better understand the characters, their differing reactions and the aftermath.

It is hard to go into detail, without giving away what the actual “incident” is, but I think if we were to spoil that part of the book for the readers of the blog, it would take away any desire you may have to read this book for yourself. The shock factor is what made this book a great read.

I agree with Janelle in that this book was longer than necessary, but I enjoyed the plot enough that it didn’t annoy me as much as it could have. This book is a must for any Liane Moriarty fan, or if you are looking for a read that creates intrigue, mystery and a little bit of heartache with a twist of humour. Sounds like an odd mix, but once you read it for yourself, you will understand what I mean!


Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

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Finality – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling, John Tiffany & Jack Thorne

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

by JK Rowling, John Tiffany & Jack Thorne

IMG_2524 (1)

Published 2016

Genres: Fiction/Young Adult

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband, and father of three school-aged children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth; sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

The eighth story.
Nineteen years later.

Mel says…

Bringing out another Harry Potter book, even as a screenplay, was always a risky move. Potterheads around the world are very passionate about the stories and speaking for myself, I was so nervous about this book. It was either going to be amazing, or ruin everything JK has created.

I am sure by now, you have realised that I am a huge Potterhead. My bio picture is of me with my nose in the first Harry Potter book, so you can assume that yes, I am obsessed!

IMG_2520 (1)

This was the first series of novels that I fell head over heels in love with. I still remember the Christmas I received the first four books from my parents, as well as the awesome day  of reading I spent with my sister (Janelle) when the final book was released. Many laughs and tears have been shed over these characters, so let me begin my honest review, with that in mind.

It was important to me to read this with an open mind and to remember that this is not meant to be read like a normal novel. For starters, it is the rehearsal edition script for The Cursed Child play, currently being held in London. This did not bother me. I found it quite easy to navigate the dialogue of each character and create the pictures in my head from the little scene setting paragraph at the beginning of each scene and act.

The original characters still play a large role within this story, but to be honest, that annoyed me. I don’t really understand why, either. I think it may be because rehashing the original main characters when they are middle aged, takes away from the magic we are so familiar with, when they were written as children in the book series.

Focusing the main story around Harry’s son Albus and Draco’s son Scorpius, was a likeable decision. I felt emotion towards Albus, as I could imagine how he would feel intimidated by having to grow up in his father’s shadow and Scorpius Malfoy was, shockingly, like another version of Ron Weasley; very likeable.

The story itself, (and I won’t go into too much detail as I don’t want to spoil too much of the plot for everyone), was in my opinion, disappointing. I was hoping for so much more and that could be due to the enormity of the Harry Potter franchise in prior years, but with JK Rowling’s as only a co-author, I felt that this impacted on the story and you could really sense the disconnection between this screenplay and the original series.

I was really wanting to rate this as amazing, purely for the Harry Potter title, but in my honest opinion, I give it 3 stars. Will I read it again? Maybe. Will I see the play if it ever hits Aussie shores? Definitely. Do I recommend other Potterheads give this a read? Let me put it this way, I am glad JK stated that this is the final adventure for Harry, Ron and Hermione. The decision to overwrite the previous ending given to the series is completely up to you! Do I still love Harry Potter? Always…


Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

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Inspiring – Wildflower by Drew Barrymore


by Drew Barrymore

FullSizeRender (1)

Published 2015

Genres: Non-fiction/Memoir

Out there in the world of chaos
All the concrete and fumes
People with determination behind the wheel
The soles of their feet wiser
Some faces with souls of routine
Others with high hope of their destination
Among all the human and industrial invention
My eyes find a tiny wildflower
With pretty yellow petals
And a brown button nose
Reminding me that there is beauty everywhere
A compass of nature
A second of stillness in my mind
As my heart races to the rhythms
Of it swaying in the wind
You are that Flower,
Reminding me of what is real



Mel says…

Before reading this book, I already admired and loved Drew for her movies. So when I saw she had released a collection of life stories, I was excited to learn more about her and her private life.

I should also note that at the start of the year, I set myself the simple New Year’s resolution of learning to appreciate and enjoy the smaller things in life. From the sound of rain, to the smell of freshly cut grass and the first moments I get to spend with my newborn daughter. This book spoke to me, through all of this wisdom.

Wildflower is written in a way that is typical of Drew’s character; free flowing. Each short story is about a different part of her life journey and that is exactly how I felt whilst reading this book, like I was on a journey. She is inspiring and truthful in all that she writes.

There is no dive into her dark childhood, like most would expect from a celebrity biography, nor is there any “dishing of the dirt” on other celebrities, so if you are looking for a juicy gossip read, this is not the book for you! Instead, this book is a journey through many of Drew’s life epiphany’s. From her young childhood years, through the teens and right up to her 40th birthday, she discusses her emancipation that forced her to grow up and fast, acting, charity work and her most important role, motherhood.

Once I closed this book, I couldn’t wait to go out and buy my own copy. I feel inspired to be creative, loving and appreciative of all the small things I have been gifted throughout my life. She has spoken to me on so many levels and I encourage all women to give this a read!

I thought I couldn’t love Drew Barrymore anymore than I already did, but I was wrong!



Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

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Why must I procrastinate when I should be reading?




Janelle says…

So, picture this. The day is over, you’re at home, dinner is done, if there are kids at your place they are in bed, the night lays ahead in all its wondrous possibility. It’s perfect reading time of course!

You settle in to a cosy spot with your book and a cup of tea, looking forward to an uninterrupted few hours of quiet reading. You open your book and read a page or so, and then you remember something you wanted to quickly check online, so you grab your phone and start tapping away. Next thing you know, an hour and a half has gone by and you’ve only just looked up from your phone, and you can’t quite believe that that much time has passed without you being able to recall what it is you’ve actually been doing. Another night of maximum reading potential, lost. AGAIN.

Does this sound familiar to you? Even if you replace reading in the story with some other favourite pastime that you would like more time for. Yet for some unfathomable reason, whenever you actually do get a window of opportunity to indulge in your hobby of choice, you seem to subconsciously sabotage it!

I don’t know why I do this, and possibly I should just teach myself to turn my phone off and hide it/hand it over to someone else/bury it. The reason is not because I’m not enjoying the book/s I’m reading, because I do this even when I’m deep in love and suspense with a story. Perhaps I’m just too curious a person to stay away from the internet for more than two minutes? Perhaps I really do just have too much to check/research/manage online that I can’t afford the time away? Or perhaps on some level, I can’t quite believe my luck at having a whole 2 or 3 hours free just for reading, and because it’s too good to be true I just throw it away instead?

Anyway, whatever the reason, writing this post has just cost me a good 20 minutes’ reading time. If you’ll excuse me…..

Satisfying – The End Of The World Running Club by Adrian J Walker

The End Of The World Running Club

by Adrian J Walker


Published 2016

Genres: Fiction / Thriller


“You want to know how it feels to run thirty miles. You want to know how it feels to run thirty miles straight through mud and across scorched earth, dodging sinkholes and crawling beneath toppled trees, when you’ve already run the length of the country, when your ankle’s sprained, your fingers are broken, you’re blind in one eye and you’ve only had half a tin of baked beans for breakfast.”

Ed is a 30-something male, married, with two small children, and already in something like a mid-life crisis. It’s clear, through the way he drinks and tries to steal any time away from the house that he can get, that he’s not satisfied with where he’s found himself.

Then one day, the whole world changes. A spattering of asteroids hit Earth and devastate whole cities. Most people die. Life as it’s known, stops. But Ed and his family survive, just. When they are rescued after weeks holed up in their cellar, they are taken to an emergency evacuation centre to bunk down with other survivors. Everyone must do their bit to pitch in. Ed volunteers to assist with patrols and scavenger hunts, which also provides him with opportunities to get away from the family. But then a patrol he’s on returns to the centre to find everyone gone, including Ed’s family, taken by helicopter to the coast where ships await to ferry survivors to South Africa, and the chance to start again.

Ed, along with five other left-behind comrades, pursue the rescue mission on foot to reunite with the other survivors. Before too long, they are running in an effort to cross the country in time to get to the boats before they depart, and an unlikely but desperate running-club is born.


Janelle says…

I LOVED this book! It ticked all the right boxes for me – a post-apocalyptic setting, well-formed characters, fast-moving plot with twists and turns, symbolism and relatable themes, thoughts to ponder, and a satisfying ending.

My summary above seems quite long, but once I started to note down the main plot points of the story, I realised how full it actually is. A lot happens in this book, and I think it was because of that that it kept my interest the whole time, whenever I would sit down to continue on with the book I would wonder what was going to happen next.

The main character, Ed, starts out as quite unlikeable. Because of his selfishness and ignorance, his family very nearly almost doesn’t survive the asteroid pummelling. Even when they narrowly escape death, he still bemoans the life he’s found himself in and doesn’t appear grateful at all. It’s only when his family is taken away from him, that he changes his tune and truly comes to realise that he does want them in his life and would do anything for them. And by the time he does do the unthinkable to get to them, we’ve come to hope for him and cheer him on.

Even though this book is set in a world and scenario that hasn’t eventuated in our time (and hopefully doesn’t!), I felt like the characters, and their decisions and the way they process their situation, were all honest and believable. Maintaining realism in a book where the plot is determined by the choices of the characters, is something I don’t always notice if it’s going right, but if it goes wrong…..boy does it give me the irrits!

If you’re just after a really good read, something that will keep you turning the pages and leave you satisfied, then this would be a great choice. I can’t fault it.



Did not like it  –  It was ok  –  Liked it  –  Really liked it  –  It was amazing

*I was provided with an ARC of this book from the publisher via Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review*

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